Post Reply 
The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Author Message
Olwen Online
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 771
Joined: May 2012
Post: #101
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Why don't we have a 'like' button? I like the above post very much! Seriously, I'm trying this. I cook lemon chicken but never have gone for the teaspoon of flour in the pan. Definitely will try!

"I'll be a story in your head. But that's ok. We're all stories in the end. Just make it a good one, eh? Because it was, you know, it was the best: a daft old man, who stole a magic box and ran away." -The Eleventh Doctor
02-15-2015 10:52 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #102
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
It's so easy--and so fast! The whole operation takes maybe 30 minutes--and the chicken is tender and juicy and lemony. It's a great way to jazz up chicken breasts. Or--it can be made with veal, instead, if one so desires.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
02-15-2015 11:28 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #103
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
This one was in the local newspaper, and it's amazing!

Feta-Stuffed Turkey Meatloaf

Heat about 1 tbs olive oil in pan; add 1 medium onion, chopped; 1 tsp salt; 1/2 tsp ground pepper; 1 tsp oregano. Cook until the onions are translucent. Add 2 cups fresh spinach, chopped, and stir until wilted.
In a large mixing bowl, combine the onion mixture with 2 lbs ground turkey, 1/2 c bread crumbs, 1/2 c chicken broth, 1 egg, and 2 tbs Worcestershire sauce.

*Here's where I'm going to deviate from the original recipe, which called for lining a baking sheet with parchment paper and placing half the turkey mixture on it, adding the cheese, and then the rest of the turkey: although turkey is very lean, it still oozes juices, so I used a baking dish. And the parchment paper seemed a waste....Today, I'm going to make this in a regular meatloaf loaf pan, oiled, and go my own way with it.*

However one elects to do it: form 1/2 the turkey mix into a 1" thick rectangle; press 3/4 c crumbled feta into the meat. Cover with the rest of the turkey mix and form a rough loaf.

Bake at 325 degrees for an hour (internal temperature of 160 degrees). Cut into slices and serve with tzatziki sauce ;

For the sauce:

In a bowl, combine and then chill:
1 c yogurt
1 tbs lemon juice
1 clove minced garlic
1/2 medium cucumber, peeled and cut in half lengthwise; very thinly sliced
1 tsp dill
1/4 tsp salt

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
05-25-2015 01:42 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Silver Ink Pot Offline
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 2,305
Joined: May 2012
Post: #104
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Sounds delicious! Tongue And a nice twist on traditional meatloaf - love the idea of a cucumber-dill sauce with that!

The New Improved Harry Potter Lexicon
Facebook / Twitter

[Image: Snape%20-%20Doe.png]
Required Reading: What is a Forum Moderator?
"It's not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom. It's the Constitution."
~ Bob Ferguson, Washington State AG
05-25-2015 04:59 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #105
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
I just finished up the deviation from the original recipe: it took about 1 1/2 hours to bake it in a loaf pan (glass) like a regular meatloaf. That might take some playing with, if you make the recipe for the first time: you might need to be a little experienced in making meatloaves.

The tzatziki sauce is addictive......I slice the cucumber thin enough to see through; I think it would also go well with lamb and work as a salad dressing.

Anyway--second time making this only proved that it's incredibly fast and easy. For both the sauce and for the meatloaf, it's just a case of dumping all the ingredients into a bowl and mixing: no finesse needed.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
05-25-2015 08:06 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Silver Ink Pot Offline
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 2,305
Joined: May 2012
Post: #106
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
I just realized that there is spinach in the recipe too, so it's really a one-dish meal! Smile

The New Improved Harry Potter Lexicon
Facebook / Twitter

[Image: Snape%20-%20Doe.png]
Required Reading: What is a Forum Moderator?
"It's not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom. It's the Constitution."
~ Bob Ferguson, Washington State AG
05-25-2015 11:28 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #107
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Cookies!

I just made these today, and........Oh. And very dangerous, as the recipe is easy and produces a lot (I got about 4 dozen!).

Butterscotch Sugar Cookies

Cream together 2 sticks of unsalted butter, 1 cup granulated sugar, and 1 cup packed brown sugar (I used dark, my favorite).
Mix in 1 egg and tsp vanilla extract.
Add in 2 1/2 cups flour, 2 tsp baking soda, 1/4 tsp salt, and 2 tsp cream of tartar.

Form walnut-sized balls and roll in sugar. Place about 1 1/2-2" apart on a baking sheet (I lined mine with silicon baking mats*, which are about the best things ever, after a stand mixer). Bake at 325 degrees for about 10 minutes, until turning golden.

Next time I make them, I believe I will weaponize them by sprinkling finely chopped pecans on top before baking.

*Buy these for a cookie baker for Christmas: he/she will bless you and probably give you lots of cookies in the future. Greasing cookie sheets makes a mess. Parchment paper is, actually, a wonderful thing--but it's expensive and not re-useable. These are, and just require being washed in soapy warm water after use and left to dry flat--I put them on the wire cooling racks.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
11-23-2015 10:59 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Silver Ink Pot Offline
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 2,305
Joined: May 2012
Post: #108
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Subtle: My daughter just got a new stove so I might get her some of the silicon baking sheets for Christmas! Big Grin

The New Improved Harry Potter Lexicon
Facebook / Twitter

[Image: Snape%20-%20Doe.png]
Required Reading: What is a Forum Moderator?
"It's not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom. It's the Constitution."
~ Bob Ferguson, Washington State AG
11-24-2015 10:36 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #109
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
I swear by the sheets. They're like magic--and easy to care for.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
11-25-2015 01:08 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Silver Ink Pot Offline
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 2,305
Joined: May 2012
Post: #110
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
This is so cute - a chocolate house instead of using gingerbread. Smile My daughter wants to try it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmg7WRtgOlU

This is so cute - a chocolate house instead of using gingerbread. :)My daughter wants to try it:




The New Improved Harry Potter Lexicon
Facebook / Twitter

[Image: Snape%20-%20Doe.png]
Required Reading: What is a Forum Moderator?
"It's not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom. It's the Constitution."
~ Bob Ferguson, Washington State AG
(This post was last modified: 12-10-2015 12:52 PM by Silver Ink Pot.)
12-10-2015 12:51 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #111
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
I have so failed at gingerbread houses.... Sad I have meringue powder now, though: I wonder if that might make a difference in the icing/mortar? Big Grin

I ran across this super-easy, delicious quick bread recipe, if you have leftover egg nog (as I did: I swear the stuff was replenishing itself in the refrigerator--confirmed, in my opinion, when I suddenly ran out of eggs on Christmas Day.....)......

Sift together 2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp nutmeg (I kicked it up to 1/2)

Cream 1/2 cup softened butter; add 1 cup sugar
Mix in 2 eggs
1 cup eggnog
2 tsp rum extract (I used straight dark rum)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Add flour mix; beat to just blend.

Pour into greased 9x5 loaf pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40-60 minutes (I think mine took 50 minutes). Cool 10 minutes and remove from pan.

This morning, I toasted slices and then buttered them and sprinkled them with granulated maple sugar--kind of like French toast; too amazingly delicious to describe.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
12-26-2015 08:25 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #112
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
This is from Southern Living magazine, February 2015--with my modifications noted......

It's called "Triple Chocolate Buttermilk Pound Cake" and it's baked in a 12-cup Bundt pan. Although, you certainly could bake it in loaf pans, like any other pound cake, I would imagine. I've only done the Bundt version because it's....spectacular looking, because the chocolate cake gets glazed with chocolate, and then glazed again with vanilla......Yes--this is in the dictionary, next to "decadence."

Sift together 2 c flour, 3/4 c unsweetened cocoa powder (I always just go for one scant cup: too much chocolate is not enough), 1/2 tsp baking powder, and 1 tsp salt. Set aside.

Cream three sticks of butter (1 1/2 c); beat in 3 c sugar until fluffy. Mix in 5 eggs, one at a time (the recipe specifies room temperature--but all cake ingredients, for all cakes, are supposed to be that.....?).

Mix together 1 1/4 c buttermilk (this can be faked by adding a tablespoon of white vinegar to milk, but it's worth the real deal for this recipe), 2 tsp instant expresso (I have never used this; only once did I put in 2 tsp of leftover morning coffee--I think this matters exactly zero to the recipe), and 2 tsp vanilla extract (now, this matters!).

Add the flour mixture and the buttermilk mixture alternately, starting with the dry.

Add 1 cup chocolate morsels (the recipe calls for 60% cacao morsels; what I do is use Nestle's mini semi-sweet morsels--I like the smaller bits for in the cake, and no one has complained that I used the pedestrian Nestle's instead of something really exotic!).

Pour into a prepared 12-c Bundt pan. The recipe says greased and floured: what I do is substitute the unsweetened cocoa powder for flour--it keeps the cake from having a chalky whiteness on the surface and only adds to the chocolate decadence. And this works for all chocolate cakes that require a greased and floured pan.

Tap pan on counter to remove air. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour 15 minutes or 1 hour 25 minutes, until cake tester comes out clean (my cakes have always taken exactly 1 hour 15 minutes; I check after an hour). Place on wire rack; cool in pan for 15 minutes (I loosen the cake with a knife run around the edges). Then cool completely on a rack.

Glazes

Chocolate: Melt 1 c semi-sweet morsels, 3 tbs butter, and 1 tbs corn syrup; after it's all melted, stir in 1/2 tsp vanilla.

Buttermilk: Mix 1 c powdered sugar, 2 tbs buttermilk, and 1/4 tsp vanilla (I have always accidently used 1/2 tsp! Big Grin ).

Drizzle the cake with the chocolate (you might want to move the cake prior to this to the serving plate you'll be using for the cake!). The chocolate has to, of course, be warm when you do the drizzling (or it'll revert to a solid!); although the recipe says "warm glazes," the buttermilk vanilla is NOT warm!!!! Let the chocolate cool on the cake before you drizzle the buttermilk on top--or the buttermilk will just melt: that's not really a bad thing (as I made that mistake), but it prevents the spectacular presentation of the double glaze.

One more side note to the original recipe: before I poured the batter in the Bundt pan, I've added chopped walnuts--that means that, when the cake is unmolded, there are walnuts in the top of the cake. My reason: BECAUSE.

Not at all a complicated recipe; although it calls for a lot of potentially expensive ingredients (like the butter and eggs), it does come out perfectly (even with my toying! Tongue )--chocoholics go insane for this.....And it looks AMAZING! For the most recent version I've made of it, I jazzed it up by adding chocolate-covered strawberries around the base. Yeah--that was over the top. I don't care.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
03-13-2016 09:27 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Olwen Online
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 771
Joined: May 2012
Post: #113
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
(03-13-2016 09:27 PM)subtle science Wrote:  This is from Southern Living magazine, February 2015--with my modifications noted......

It's called "Triple Chocolate Buttermilk Pound Cake" and it's baked in a 12-cup Bundt pan. Although, you certainly could bake it in loaf pans, like any other pound cake, I would imagine. I've only done the Bundt version because it's....spectacular looking, because the chocolate cake gets glazed with chocolate, and then glazed again with vanilla......Yes--this is in the dictionary, next to "decadence."

Sift together 2 c flour, 3/4 c unsweetened cocoa powder (I always just go for one scant cup: too much chocolate is not enough), 1/2 tsp baking powder, and 1 tsp salt. Set aside.

Cream three sticks of butter (1 1/2 c); beat in 3 c sugar until fluffy. Mix in 5 eggs, one at a time (the recipe specifies room temperature--but all cake ingredients, for all cakes, are supposed to be that.....?).

Mix together 1 1/4 c buttermilk (this can be faked by adding a tablespoon of white vinegar to milk, but it's worth the real deal for this recipe), 2 tsp instant expresso (I have never used this; only once did I put in 2 tsp of leftover morning coffee--I think this matters exactly zero to the recipe), and 2 tsp vanilla extract (now, this matters!).

Add the flour mixture and the buttermilk mixture alternately, starting with the dry.

Add 1 cup chocolate morsels (the recipe calls for 60% cacao morsels; what I do is use Nestle's mini semi-sweet morsels--I like the smaller bits for in the cake, and no one has complained that I used the pedestrian Nestle's instead of something really exotic!).

Pour into a prepared 12-c Bundt pan. The recipe says greased and floured: what I do is substitute the unsweetened cocoa powder for flour--it keeps the cake from having a chalky whiteness on the surface and only adds to the chocolate decadence. And this works for all chocolate cakes that require a greased and floured pan.

Tap pan on counter to remove air. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour 15 minutes or 1 hour 25 minutes, until cake tester comes out clean (my cakes have always taken exactly 1 hour 15 minutes; I check after an hour). Place on wire rack; cool in pan for 15 minutes (I loosen the cake with a knife run around the edges). Then cool completely on a rack.

Glazes

Chocolate: Melt 1 c semi-sweet morsels, 3 tbs butter, and 1 tbs corn syrup; after it's all melted, stir in 1/2 tsp vanilla.

Buttermilk: Mix 1 c powdered sugar, 2 tbs buttermilk, and 1/4 tsp vanilla (I have always accidently used 1/2 tsp! Big Grin ).

Drizzle the cake with the chocolate (you might want to move the cake prior to this to the serving plate you'll be using for the cake!). The chocolate has to, of course, be warm when you do the drizzling (or it'll revert to a solid!); although the recipe says "warm glazes," the buttermilk vanilla is NOT warm!!!! Let the chocolate cool on the cake before you drizzle the buttermilk on top--or the buttermilk will just melt: that's not really a bad thing (as I made that mistake), but it prevents the spectacular presentation of the double glaze.

One more side note to the original recipe: before I poured the batter in the Bundt pan, I've added chopped walnuts--that means that, when the cake is unmolded, there are walnuts in the top of the cake. My reason: BECAUSE.

Not at all a complicated recipe; although it calls for a lot of potentially expensive ingredients (like the butter and eggs), it does come out perfectly (even with my toying! Tongue )--chocoholics go insane for this.....And it looks AMAZING! For the most recent version I've made of it, I jazzed it up by adding chocolate-covered strawberries around the base. Yeah--that was over the top. I don't care.

Serves one. Big Grin

"I'll be a story in your head. But that's ok. We're all stories in the end. Just make it a good one, eh? Because it was, you know, it was the best: a daft old man, who stole a magic box and ran away." -The Eleventh Doctor
03-13-2016 09:40 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #114
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Here's something that's a bit healthier (not that I regret anything about the Southern Living cake!)--a cauliflower "pizza":

Use a food processor or grater to "rice" one head of cauliflower. Blot the grated cauliflower with paper towels, to get rid of some of the moisture.

In a bowl, mix the cauliflower with 2 eggs, oregano, basil, a little rosemary, salt, and pepper, plus one minced garlic clove (all the seasonings can be adjusted to your own taste). Put a sheet of parchment paper on a baking sheet: lightly oil the paper. Press the cauliflower "dough" out to about 1/2" thick. Bake it at 425 F for 30 minutes, until golden brown. Remove and let sit for about five minutes, to set.

Spread with one can of tomato paste. I then topped mine with shredded fresh spinach, but this is where it can get really free form, depending upon what you want for topping(s). Finish with shredded mozzarella cheese. Bake for 10 more minutes. Cool five minutes before serving.

It holds together pretty well as a "slice"; obviously, you have to be a fan of cauliflower for this--if so, it tastes pretty amazing!

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
03-25-2016 10:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Silver Ink Pot Offline
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 2,305
Joined: May 2012
Post: #115
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Subtle: My daughter and her husband make cauliflower mac and cheese and they love it!

http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/recipes/21...uliflower/

On Facebook some of us have been drooling over this - Vidalia Onion Upside Down Cornbread. They also put broccoli in it, but I think cream-style corn would taste better with the sweet onions. Or if you want something green inside it, put green chiles or chopped green onions! (Or both!)

http://sweetsavant.com/2015/07/29/vidali...cornbread/

[Image: Vidalia%20Onion%20Cornbread.png]

The New Improved Harry Potter Lexicon
Facebook / Twitter

[Image: Snape%20-%20Doe.png]
Required Reading: What is a Forum Moderator?
"It's not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom. It's the Constitution."
~ Bob Ferguson, Washington State AG
(This post was last modified: 05-02-2016 11:10 PM by Silver Ink Pot.)
05-02-2016 11:09 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #116
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Okay--I've got two. Tongue

First, for jalapenos--although the brine would work for any vegetable, really:

4 c sliced peppers

Bring to boil: 1 1/2 c white vinegar
1 1/2 c water
3 whole, peeled garlic cloves
2 tbs black peppercorns
2 tbs Kosher salt
2 tbs sugar
2 tbs coriander seeds

Reduce heat and simmer for five minutes.

Pour over peppers in jars; seal and cool; refrigerate. The recipe says that this is good for a month.

Second: English Muffin Loaves. Yes, this bread makes loaves that taste like English muffins!

Grease two loaf pans and sprinkle with cornmeal [my experience: be really generous with the greasing!].

Combine 3 c flour, 4 1/2 tsp yeast, 1 tbs sugar, 2 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp baking soda

Heat 2 c milk and 1/2 c water to 120 degrees F. Add to flour mix. Stir in more flour (fpr 5 1/2-6 c total) to make stiff dough [I needed 5 3/4]. Knead 5 minutes.
Divide in half; place in loaf pans, cover and let rise 45 minutes. Bake at 400F for 25 minutes [me, I'll go 30 next time]. Remove to rack to cool.

Do not eat both loaves yourself as soon as you can cut them.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
07-07-2016 09:43 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #117
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
A Happy New Year recipe or two, as my friends and I just indulged in these for our New Year's dinner.....

First, a "paste" to rub on a beef roast. It's from chef Tyler Florence, and it's supposed to be used on prime rib; well, I had a far cheaper 6 pound sirloin roast--and it was out of this world.

Mash together 5 garlic cloves, 1/4 c horseradish, 1 rosemary sprig, 4 thyme sprigs, 1/2 c kosher salt, 1/4 c black pepper, and 1/ c olive oil. Slather it all over the beef roast. Roast at 350 degrees for two hours.

Our roast came out perfect: well done at the ends (as one friend prefers) and medium/medium rare throughout the middle.

A side dish, also from Tyler Florence: Roasted Red Onions. Combine 6 tbs butter, 3 tbs balsamic vinegar, 1/2 c honey, 1/2 bunch thyme, and salt/pepper in a sauce pan. Simmer until slightly reduced/thickened. Pour over halved red onions in a baking dish (we used three whole onions; TF calls for four). Roast 45-60 minutes at 350 degrees. Wow...................

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
01-02-2017 02:38 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
subtle science Offline
Minister of Literature
*****

Posts: 1,038
Joined: May 2012
Post: #118
RE: The Half-Baked Prince Restarted Restaurant
Cauliflower "rice" (I'd say the consistency is more like couscous!):

Food process the florets of a head of cauliflower. Set aside.

In a large pan, saute chopped onion and minced garlic in olive oil--at least 1/2 cup of onion and 3 cloves of garlic; the amount doesn't matter except to your taste buds. Give it about three minutes and then add the cauliflower; cover and cook about six minutes--give it a stir or two along the way. Add salt and pepper to taste, about a tablespoon of dried parsley/1/4 c fresh, and a shot of lemon juice.

Basically, you can season the "rice" any way you want. What I found is that this method eliminates having to press the water from the cauliflower.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.
--T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"

We have built no Temple but the CAPITOL; We consult no common oracle but the Constitution.

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (King James Version, Matthew 25: 37-40)
06-13-2017 10:13 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)